Thursday, September 27, 2018

No Need For Brands to Reinvent the Wheel. Or Predictive, Cross-Media ROI.

For many years, we’ve urged clients to trust predictive brand metrics. They work really, really well for brand and media planning.

Our media application, “Brand-to-Media-Engagement,” or B2ME, was created just as media planning was moving into the digital world, and that’s when “digital” pretty much translated to “banner ad.”

Well, no surprise, like the rest of the marketing world, planning for digital became more complex. So Brand Keys came up with some new approaches, which the ARF applied in their cross-media ROI work for the  “How Advertising Works, Today” initiative. And our predictive metrics did precisely what they were supposed to do. Predict.

They predicted how well media platforms reinforced consumers’ emotional engagement with a brand and what combinations of media worked best for the brand. Strategically. If you do that, you’ll alwayssee positive behavior in the marketplace, meaning sales and profits, as opposed to just tweets and likes. 

Correlations of our B2ME assessments with sales were 0.80+, so worthy of a validated designation, “predictive!”

Last week, a MediaPost article announced brand data has become more pivotal in determining which combinations of digital ad stacks will deliver the best strategic advantage. Essentially, it welcomed brand metrics back to a seat at the Media planning table, something we heartily applaud.

Happily, there’s no need for brands to reinvent the wheel, or in this case, a way of identifying which combination of media platforms will work more effectively for your brand. We’ve already done that with B2ME.

If you’re interested in optimizing your digital ad stack (or any other set of media platforms), we’d be happy to help. Because we can confidently predict increased brand engagement and sales for brands that predictively plan.

In the digital or analog world.



Find out more about what makes customer loyalty happen and how Brand Keys metrics is able to predict future consumer behavior: brandkeys.com. Visit our YouTube channel to learn more about Brand Keys methodology, applications and case studies.

Monday, September 17, 2018

Extra! Extra! Read All About It! President Less Trustworthy Than Newspapers.

A recent Brand Keys study measured “trust” among readers of their newspapers-of-choice. 

Sure, ideology self-defines selection when it comes to subscribing to a newspaper (in print or digital), but “Trust” accounts for 41% of actual newspaper brand engagement. 

The remaining 59% is accounted for by content and values addressing “entertainment listings and sports,” “an ability to educate and inform via news reporting, columnists, and editorial,” and providing insights into the “economy and local events and markets.”

Three thousand eight hundred six (3,806) subscribers (hard copy) or “regular newsreaders” via digital or app (3+ times a week) evaluated their newspapers, with the following results:


SIDEBAR: Since President Trump has labeled The New York Timesas “failing,” and virtually every other news platform as “fake news” and/or “enemy of the people,” we also measured how much “trust” newspaper readers had in the President. 

Mr. Trump was rated an overall 24% (five percentage points lower than TV news viewers, 64% lower than The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal). 

Democratic newspaper readers rated Mr. Trump 9%, Independents 16%, and Republicans 29%. Eighteen percent (18%) of the sample had “No Opinion.
The next wave of the Brand Keys Media Trust Tracker will visit “Online” Platforms. 



Find out more about what makes customer loyalty happen and how Brand Keys metrics is able to predict future consumer behavior: brandkeys.com. Visit our YouTube channel to learn more about Brand Keys methodology, applications and case studies.

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Top-100 Loyalty Leaders & 3 Brands Taking Over the World

Brand Keys 22nd annual Loyalty Leaders List is an analysis providing a comprehensive, cross-category perspective of brand loyalty today. 

Loyalty’s Top Line: Digital and tech brands held their ground. Traditional brands worked harder and moved up the list an average of 11 positions. Big winners included T.J. Maxx, 5 Guys Burgers, Zara, and Lyft.

For an analysis of this year’s results we invite you to read Paul Ausick’s 24/7 Wall Street article, “Tech Brands Dominate Brand Loyalty Rankings.”

Oh, joke all you want about certain brands taking over the world, but from a loyalty perspective it’s a reality. 

So not so much of a joke, and the loyalty Rule of Sixplaying itself out in the real world. Consumers that exhibit high degrees of brand loyalty in one category are 6 times more likely to use the same brand in another category. Brands in multiple categories this year were Amazon, Apple, and Google.

For this year’s top-100 Loyalty Leaders click here. 

Loyalty’s Bottom Line: Brands that make loyalty and emotional engagement a strategic priority alwaysappear high on our list. Most importantly, they alwaysappear at the top of consumers’ shopping lists too.


Find out more about what makes customer loyalty happen and how Brand Keys metrics is able to predict future consumer behavior: brandkeys.com. Visit our YouTube channel to learn more about Brand Keys methodology, applications and case studies.


Wednesday, September 05, 2018

Churchill on Branding

There’s a Churchill quote that can be applied to brands. (OK, there’s a Churchill quote that can be applied to everything, but this one happens to work for brands!)

The last part goes, “But the past should give us hope.”

We mention that because, more older brands – “legacy” brands – are repositioning themselves and their marketing to be more attractive to younger consumers. And let’s be honest about it, an older brand’s awareness, gives it a big head start versus having to create a new brand from scratch. The older brand already has some values built into it. 

All it takes is time and insight into what another generation values most in the category in which you’re going to compete. Imbue your brand, advertising, and marketing with those values and, voilĂ , you’ll have a new old brand! 

You know the luxury brand Shinola? They sell handbags for $1,400, watches for $1,200 and bicycles for $3,000.  Not bad for a brand started life as a shoe polish in 1877.

Want to know what other brands are up to? We invite you to read Janet Morrissy’s New York Times Advertising column, “Legacy Brands Tell Younger Generations: We’re Not Just for Your Parents.” Or in some cases, your grandparents.

As to the beginning of what Churchill said, it went, “The future is unknowable,” and maybe that’s true about history, but not about predictive brand assessments! 

Today you don’t have to rely on just hope, because our psychologically-based, emotional engagement metrics canidentify values consumers can’t, won’t, or haven’t yet articulated about what they truly desire beforeyou start your re-branding efforts. More importantly those metrics identify values that get consumers to buy. 

No matter how old your new brand happens to be.


Find out more about what makes customer loyalty happen and how Brand Keys metrics is able to predict future consumer behavior: brandkeys.com. Visit our YouTube channel to learn more about Brand Keys methodology, applications and case studies.