Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Who Is America’s Most Patriotic Brand?

We all know there’s no shortage of brand challenges.

And yes, brands have always had to compete in sector-driven frameworks. 

But now they have to compete in socio-political contexts too, the most fundamental challenge there being what does it mean for a brand to be  “patriotic.” 

Why is it the most fundamental?

Well, political polarization, consumer tribalism, and more fervent social movements have upended traditional brand perceptions. That’s deepened the need for brands to define themselves when it comes to being “patriotic.”Flags and fireworks alone won’t do it anymore. 

Consumers – all genders, ages, and political affiliations – now see themselves as being more “patriotic.” The challenge? To manage your brand, so consumers recognize the patriotic values they see and feel in themselves. 

For insights into the patriotism challenge we invite you to read Ethan Jakob Craft’s AdAgearticle “Jeep, Disney, Ford & More: Consumer Survey Reveals America’s Most Patriotic Brands.”

For a complete list of brands leading this year’s patriotism parade, look here.

Today, patriotism isn’t just nice to have. More and more it’s a value brands needto have. 

And when you’ve got it, consumers don’t just stand up and salute, they line up and buy!

Happy Independence Day!


Find out more about what makes customer loyalty happen and how Brand Keys metrics is able to predict future consumer behavior: brandkeys.com. Visit our YouTube channel to learn more about Brand Keys methodology, applications and case studies.

Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Marketing is a lot like sex. . .

. . . everybody thinks they’re good at it!

But, unfortunately, they’re not. 

The brandscape is littered with brands that didn’t market right and paid the price.

Here’s one brand that went from #1 to #19 (aka “last”) in their category in the 2019 Customer Loyalty Engagement Index.

The problem? Consumers didn’t buy their marketing or their vision of sex.

Here’s why.



Find out more about what makes customer loyalty happen and how Brand Keys metrics is able to predict future consumer behavior: brandkeys.com. Visit our YouTube channel to learn more about Brand Keys methodology, applications and case studies.

Sunday, June 02, 2019

What to Do When Ad Campaigns & Logos Don’t Work

Wells Fargo has struggled to engage (and re-engage) its customers. But recently the bank’s loyalty numbers improved: 58% to  73%. True, not great when you consider other banks are in generally the high 80’s, but something.

Apologies to customers and ad campaigns don’t go as far in this socially-networked world as they did 25 years ago. What the brand faces was never something that could be fixed with mid-20th century public relations & communication tactics.

Wells Fargo has bad brand karma. Nobody believed their ads. Why would they? They betrayed customer trust.

A new logo? The CMO  insisted, “The changes to our stagecoach paid homage to our history while signaling a transformation to a contemporary, dynamic, and ever more innovative bank.”  One can only suppose he wasn’t talking about innovative ways of creating fake credit card accounts. 

Their approach was bound to fail. 

And it did. 

But Wells Fargo’s loyalty improved recently. How so? 

For insights into how the bank managed its own critical brand asset, we invite you to read Tanya Gazdik’s Financial Review in Marketing Daily.

The bottom line? They finally pulled the right loyalty lever, which might have been culturally labeled “Throw the Rascals Out.”

If they had predictive loyalty metrics, they would have known that. High percent-contribution loyalty values always point the right road for a brand to take. Which is important.

Especially if your logo is a stagecoach.


Find out more about what makes customer loyalty happen and how Brand Keys metrics is able to predict future consumer behavior: brandkeys.com. Visit our YouTube channel to learn more about Brand Keys methodology, applications and case studies.